Life evolving behind the lens

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Snapshots of the Audience

A while ago, I got to talking to a friend on Writing.com, and his comments spurred Identity Crisis. However, these’s one aspect of his comments I didn’t cover there, and I actually forgot about it until a month or so ago when I attended a premiere at a local photo gallery. That aspect is audience expectations.

Kitty Portrait Session

Steve (said friend) said that artistic photography should make some sort of statement about reality. I’ve already stated the reasons I disagree with that idea. In recent weeks, though, I’ve found I might not be the only one. Let me clarify that. I’m not the only one among photography consumers that merits technique and aesthetics over commentary. This is a mindset that can be found even among some (semi) professional photographers. This exhibit was held at Minneapolis Photo Center, a place I didn’t even know existed until last summer. It’s a place that you really only know about if photography is a big deal to you.

Oncoming

The premiere was really crowded, and I had to wait a bit to move from photo to photo. As a result, I had a chance to do some eavesdropping. It was incredibly fascinating. Many people who attended the show focused on the form and technique photographers employed. The nature (heh) of the exhibit certainly encouraged technical remarks. Even so, there were a lot of comments that could apply to most photo exhibits. In particular, I heard one gentleman remark on people downright abusing Photoshop to turn photos into paintings. I totally understand that complaint. Even so, at least these individuals used Photoshop in a plausibly convincing manner.

As Time Floats By

It was a pleasant surprise ti hear so many people focus strictly on what was in front of them. (Pardon the pun. Again.) There wasn’t any speculation about the photographer’s intent or any larger message. It was people simply enjoying the photos at face value. More to the point, it was people who regularly peruse photography taking everything at face value. Seeing and hearing people admire (or criticize) the images themselves proved enlightening. It also made me wonder about other photography audiences.

Decayed Dreams

I admit I haven’t been around non-photography audiences as much as I’ve been around those who are more immersed in the photography world. When I’ve been around the former, the comments are less technical. At the same time, there aren’t many people seeing the exhibited photos as grandiose statements. Some people remarked on how the photos reflected the times. Others noted very general observations about the composition of the photos. You could hear a pin drop when nudity was involved. Hey, I live in the US and am speaking from experience in US museums. What do you expect? In any case, the comments were broad and superficial even in museum settings. I found that to be intriguing. I think I’ll need to make some more observations, though, to see if this holds up.

Full On

And the World Goes Boom

Round Robin

Singing in the  Plains

Identity Crisis

As you might have guessed from the lack of updates here, my job almost succeeded in eating me alive. Almost.

Rooted in Conflict

Oddly enough, it was my job that indirectly tipped off an identity crisis when it comes to photography. When I started training, I learned that two of my cohorts dabble in the craft. One of them happens to be really good at it.I’d rather not share his work here right now (as it will probably lead him here to this blog, which I’m not ready for him to find). Feel free to leave me a comment if you wish to see it. The thing about his portfolio is it made me feel like an inferior photographer. I saw through the fisheye lens and liberal post-production work to suss out solid composition and excellent timing. I am especially impressed with his shots of birds. Given how much I like birdies, I suddenly felt a bit unworthy. The praise posted did not help things. I had a bit of a meltdown over it, and only chats with a few different friends helped me determine what to do in regards to my future in taking pictures.

Cockiness

Long story short, I’ve started to really accept that I’m a technician and not an artist. When I raised the question of quitting photography on Facebook on Writing.com, the point was raised about artistic photography making a statement. Here’s the thing. I don’t always see photography that way, especially artistic works. When I view photos in a physical gallery or exhibit space, I look at how the photo utilizes foreground/midground/background facets of composition. I also consider how much I can immerse myself in the scene on a base level. Ultimately, that’s what I try to do with my photography. I aim to engage sense beyond sight. I want people to imagine the texture of flower petals, the scent of a goat’s enclosure, or hear the breeze jostling objects in a scene. I do this through various in-camera/in the field techniques. I feel that the vast majority of post-processing takes away from achieving this goal. Yes, this does apply to the work of the photographer I mentioned earlier.

The Mist in the Gorge in the Valley

When I’ve dabbled in competitions, I have had some success. Aside from my YBS Top 100 milestone, I have people favoriting/voting for my photos on I Shot It. I can’t say for sure if these people are experiencing what I share on a sensory level. It’s all anonymous, kind of like an actual gallery where I’m not around to directly observe their reactions. My photos seem to do things for some people, though. I guess I have that going for me.

The Way Way Up

Ultimately, camera technique interests me way more than post-processing (even if I can stomach Lightroom). I care more about finding lenses that will best fit my budget and subjects than I do about actions. Staying quiet to not disturb the wildlife I photograph is more important to me than staying on top of photo software updates. If these priorities mean I’m a technical photographer and not an artistic one, then that’s what I am. Why I keep trying my hand at artistic pursuits I’ll never know.

The Gaze

Being in the technical camp means I don’t have a whole lot of support out there, but I do have some. Ken Rockwell’s op-ed on RAW files echoes some of the sentiments I have when it comes to the craft of photography. I suppose it’s nice to see someone echo my thoughts when that person’s photography background is way different than mine. As I dove back into photography courtesy of working in a photo lab, I saw some lovely things come out of developing film by placing it through automatically timed chemical baths and nearly no interference in printing. Some customers I developed film for were taking photography classes and brought their film to my store. It was fun to see their work because it was really gorgeous. Because of that, I got to see stunning work created without post-processing meddling. If there was ever a moment that my anti-manipulation dogma took root, this would be it.

Bluebell Wannabes

It all boils down to this. I’m a technique freak that’s been trying to bite off more than I can chew. I’ve gotten lucky in that regard in the past, but this time around it finally became too much. It’s in my best interest to stay focused on improving technique since my desire to make a grand statement on a topic with my photos doesn’t appeal to me. Here’s to actually staying true to my technique-oriented self. I hope I can do this.

Cliff Side Story
Flowery Language
Stick Around
Always On Edge
Up in the Air
The Lure Below
Swirlygig
Carry Across the Waves

See You at the Crossroads

I have started a new job, one that I’m genuinely happy to be endeavoring on. Of course, this means changes to my routine, and every routine change prompts me to think about what is important in my life. Because I have so many interests, I have to figure out how much time I’m going to devote to them, although these choices aren’t usually consciously made. That’s…a problem, actually.

In the Secret Garden

Photography is one of my interests, but it’s not the only one. I tend to take on very demanding goals when I pursue a hobby, and taking pictures is full of those types of goals. So is writing. So is running. Lately, photography is where I’ve made the most headway. On the one hand, this is a good thing in light of next year’s plans. On the other hand, this headway is coming at the cost of slacking in my other interests.

All Dholed Out

I entered Adoramapix’s Your Best Shot 2015 contest and (surprisingly) got into the Top 100 with a shot that I didn’t hold in super high regard. In previous years, I’ve made my initial selections and then asked for feedback from people on my Facebook friends list. This time around, I hard some major difficult in whittling it down to less than 10 photos. I called upon a couple of photo-happy friends to narrow down a 30 photo list before I presented the selections to people on Facebook. They listed their top ten picks, and I grabbed the photo names that appeared on both lists. The results surprised me.

Hotter Than the Sun

In previous years, I’ve gone with close-ups of flowers or machines in bright sunlight. These subjects have become my wheelhouses, if you will. What I found safe and appealing, though, was not unanimously liked by my photographer friends. Though close ups were still dominant in the selections, the lighting and subjects all vastly differed from each other. In that mix was an ultralow light shot I snagged in the Twin Cities Model Railroad Museum in January 2014. I still need to blog about that visit, but the point is one of those shots appeared on both lists. It was also near the top, to boot. I ended up selecting six photos to share on Facebook for more general feedback. While three of them were well liked, that railroad museum shot quickly became a favorite. Even though the ISO was jacked so high that noise was a bit of a problem, I decided to go with the feedback and enter that photo.

Pass By Night

What you see there is my entry, and that photo has gotten further than anything I’ve entered in a photo competition (and a national one, to boot). For me, it was a huge risk. I had no choice but to edit it to reduce the noise, but I made sure I spent no more than ten minutes making noise reduction/color corrections. While I didn’t get any further, it showed me I have reached a major point in my photography evolution. I have shown I can hold my own in photography competitions (even with a lower end DSLR and a kit lens). There is still plenty to learn, but I now see that I just might have a chance to make something of all the photography work I’ve done throughout the years.

Wisdom in Captivity

At this point, the question becomes what do I do in terms of going further with photography and entering competitions? Do I want to try to diversify my subjects to get further in competition? Diversification in subjects is going to mean practicing people photography more frequently. I’m kind of doing this with sports photography so my Olympics photos look at least halfway decent. At its core, though, art (and photography) centers on triggering emotional responses, which is easier to do on a large scale with photos of people. As someone who is autistic, that is incredibly challenging. Hiking through ice caves with 50 pounds of gear sounds blissful compared to photographing other people. Portraits are not necessarily a strong point for me, and I’m not sure how much I can bring myself to practice that, anyhow. Street photography is more suited to my spontaneous approach to photography, but not having a solid grasp on the legal implications makes that a bit tough to swallow at the moment.

Floating on a Prayer

My instinct is to improve from a technical standpoint. This means seeking out more challenging lighting situations, such as nights, sunrises/sunsets, action in low light, and lots of other scenarios. It also means more gear grappling. I’ll probably need to bring my tripod around more as well as invest in a a remote shutter release device. I’ve already started pricing out the latter, but getting in the habit of juggling the former is going to take time. I’m not used to it. On top of that, figuring out how well that all works with an older Tamron lens is going to be an annoyance for the ages. I will most likely have to break down and buy at least one new Nikon lens to resolve the autofocus compatibility issues I’m having. Right now, my reflexes are not quick enough to execute manual focus on action shots (although I have been trying my hand at that lately with somewhat mixed results).

Not Feeling Well-ington

I have goals, and I know what needs work. That’s about the easiest part of determining what to do abot photography in the short and semi-long term. The question is what I ought to be doing with a schedule that is getting increasingly intense. I am motivated to bring my mile time down, and the training needed will be longer and more intense in the next few months. Work is also going to be a very long learning process (although it feels strangely okay right now). With writing, I have a novel project planned since I don’t have a full novel to my name. That’s about the only thing I haven’t done writing-wise. It looks like photography may have to kick back a little bit in 2015. That almost makes sense considering how much time I devoted to it last year and will be devoting to it next year. I just hope I can maintain the skills I have.

Little Gripper
Now 25
Blue Beauty
Rainshower Remnants
Seal of Approval

Other Southern Adventures

So what else did I photograph during this particular sojourn to Florida? Plenty. I admit much of it was for a special Mars and Darwin book I plan to give to my parents this year, but there were still moments worthy of sharing here.

Release the Kraken?

(As a matter of fact, that is my husband being silly at a playground. Why do you ask? :-))

We explored new places this time around, including DuPuis Nature Preserve in western Martin County. I drove by the place many times in my late teens and early 20s but never actually visited. I finally got there on our last full day in the wang. I also took my husband to the Port Mayaca Cemetery to show him the mass grave for the victims of the 1928 hurricane. I had been there a few times before and was kind of surprised at the changes I saw with the place. It was my husband’s first time there, though, so I set aside my surprise to show him around. By that point, though, I’d already been handed a couple other surprises.

Balancing the Spear in the Rock

During this trip, we discovered a park in Sewell’s Point that I had no idea even existed; stoppedd by Bayside Marketplace only to find it way more crowded than I expected; and tiptoed around at least a dozen Portuguese Man O Wars. These new adventures provided contrast to revisiting some of our old haunts. We probably won’t return for at least two more years, and that’s a trip I expect to have a lot of new adventures. Until then, enjoy these slices from South Florida.

Unexpected Immersion
A Holiday in the Uncanny Valley
Where Man Meets the Ocean
Natural Detritus
The Baby on the Beach
Imperial Worship By the Vain
Coconutty
Dolphin Tide
A Tattered Legacy
A New Take on Leaving Stones
The Peaceful Pier
That Rare Wildflower
Power Puss
Glamour Puss

This Central Florida Dreamscape

My husband made the suggestion that we revisit Bok Tower and Gardens. We were last there in 2012, but I think he really wanted to go back so he could take lots of pictures. I can’t say I blame him.

Lilliputian

Even though we’ve been to Bok Tower in December a couple times before, the sun has never been this bright. As a result, my pictures are sharper than usual. I’m not going to complain since this gave me more opportunities to photograph the tower while emphasizing contrasting colors. Granted, the reduced cloud cover allowed for much deeper blue skies. Even when there has been sun on previous trips there has been enough cloud cover to mute everything.

En Concert

We wandered a good portion of the grounds, including the Pinewood Mansion in all its holiday glory. While snowmen were next to nonexistent, there were lots of other splendid subjects for still life and even action photography. So let’s take a trip into this Central Florida dreamscape.

The Island
Your Goldenrod Daydreams
A Birdy Conga Line
The Smallest Safe Haven
Lives All Aglow
Fern Gully
Toys from the Gilded Age
Holiday Glitterati
Pretty Poison
The Gift

All About Birdies

I have a lot to catch up on, and for the sake of getting it done I’m not going in chronological order. So let’s kick off with something fun. By fun, I mean birds. I love photographing birds. You should know that by now.

Bob for Fred

Not surprisingly, one of my favorite things to do when I visit Florida is photograph all the birdies I encounter. If my husband and I are at a park, we’ll trail birds as long as possible. Well, I’ll tail the birds, and he’ll watch me.😀 The birds amuse us both, but our reactions are far different.

Pigeon Sunbathing Hour

We visited a lot of different places in Florida but didn’t see a huge variety of birds. That was a bit of a bummer, but I managed with what I found. Between beach-dwelling pigeons and a crap ton of little blue herons, I had a field day with photographing these little dinosaur descendants. Had I seen more varieties (including cormorants, roseate spoonbills and sandhill cranes) my head would have most likely exploded. On that note, enjoy my birdy shots! I know I have tons of fun with them.🙂

Little Blue Mangrove
Balancing Act
Lunch Break, Anyone?
Get It To Go
A Wade in the Park
The New Black Beauty
Squeak Toy on the Lam
Clean and Preen
Face the Three, Check the Six
Air Clean Up Crew

It’s Come to This

I’ve been away for a really long time. I know. Things have been crazy as work went from okay to downright bad thanks to an automotive accident. I ended up quitting my job because I couldn’t physically handle the work. Since then, I’ve been going on quite a few interviews and doing everything I could to get my hand fully functional again. Photography has helped there. So has typing. It’s time to combine those activities right here.

Snack Time

You’re probably wondering what’s prompted me to update this blog six months after the fact. I wish I could say it’s to show off my photos from two fairly major trips I’ve taken. I also can’t claim that setting up a satirical Instagram feed had anything to do with it. There’s also the technical aspects about maintaining this blog that don’t qualify as motivation to update this thing; in fact, they’re quite the opposite. Never mind the fact that I’ve made some progress in photo competitions. Nope. My inspiration came from a goddamn Cracked.com article. My life is indeed a very sad thing. So let’s talk about it, then.

I think there are legitimate points in this article. However, it’s very narrow in scope when it comes to those who are anti-Photoshop. Most of the article discusses how women are portrayed in terms of visual media, but there are a few broader points. They tend to be clustered in point #4, which covers lighting, perspective and other tricks used to manipulate how a subject looks. For people who actually take pictures, this information isn’t really anything new. In fact, anyone who has any knowledge of photography would be practically screaming “DUH!” at the top of their lungs and facepalming hard enough to give themselves concave noses.

Out to Pasture

And that’s my point. Why do we need Photoshop when we photographers have lots of other tools at our disposal? We have lenses, polarizing filters, sunlight, hacks for beauty dishes, and so many more things that can make the same adjustments in Photoshop without having to juggle with workflows and similar horse hockey. One time, I actually used my sunglasses as a filter for a shot. If you know enough tricks and have taken the time to learn how to judge the light you’re given, you can pull off lots of things people create in Photoshop without having to do a thing in post. Why rely on a computer to distort reality when you can learn more analog moves that are more subtle and can sometimes do a lot more for you? Plus you can reduce the likelihood of becoming chained to your computer for editing every single photo you decide to show off.

My attitude may be influenced by not photographing people all that much. I’ll cop to that. I still don’t see the need to Photoshop landscapes or animal shots into oblivion. It strikes me as lazy and not willing to put out effort into the field. When I watch Photoshop tutorials online, I wonder half the time what prevented the photographer from moving to a different spot to frame the photo or wait for a different time of day when the lighting was less challenging. Perhaps this is me being at my most romantic, holding onto the belief that the best photographers avoid the editing room because they possess the cleverness to capture the magic in the field. Maybe I don’t want to believe that the human eye is so conditioned to Photoshop that anything left untouched looks weird to them. Well, guys. Reality is a weird little thing to perceive. Perhaps it’s face to face reality on its terms instead of through excessive string pulling meant to match your desires.

Men Dream of This

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